11 Places to Donate Clothes

How to Donate Old Clothes “People should give as much thought to where they donate their clothes as to where they donate their money,” says Goodwill spokesperson Christine Nyirjesy Bragale. The following organizations are all nonprofit.

No matter which charity you choose, your unused clothes will do more good in a donation bin than sitting in your closet. A good rule of thumb:

Donate clothing appropriate for a conservative office environment, including business suits and shoes, and clothing suitable for a business casual dress code in less formal work environments. Donate separates such as jackets, sweaters, pants and skirts.
Donate at your doortstep We will come to your doorstep to pick up the donations at the appointed time and deliver them to the NGO where they can be given a new life. Get Rewards.
Donate Clothing in NYC Drop-off clothing at charities around the city to help men, women, and children in need. Since the Coat Drive began 29 years ago, we have collected and distributed million winter coats to New Yorkers in need.
You might have seen trucks driving through neighborhoods or bins set up in shopping center parking lots to collect old clothes. This indicates there’s importance associated to donating clothes versus simply throwing them away.
Donating your clothes that are in good condition helps us fund development projects all over the world. Your donation is tax deductible and you can easily get a receipt on our website. Recycling your clothes with holes, stains, or tears is good for the environment.
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Also, some of my old clothes that are not worth donating, gets used as rags. Better to be practical than waste. Oh. one more thing that I can think of is that I have used some clothes for making doll clothes for my grand daughter.

Take that pair of bluejeans you may have recently donated. Your jeans are stuffed with others into tightly sealed plastic bales weighing about pounds and containing about pairs of jeans. The bales are loaded into huge containers and sold to international shippers who put them on ships bound for Africa and other developing regions.

Again, the price of your old jeans has increased a bit because the shipper had to buy them. That's a percent increase in value just by opening up the bale of clothes.

That's a bargain for African shoppers -- most of them are low-income earners who cannot afford to buy newly made U. And jeans are by no means the only American charity clothing items on sale here. I saw everything from T-shirts with U. All of them used. There are two ways to look at all this. One view is that it is wrong for entrepreneurs to profit from what you give away to charity, and that by dumping huge amounts of cheap U. And we've seen those markets virtually disappear over the last decade or two.

Athreya concedes that the African market for used U. ABC News has spoken to various sources who point out that Africa also lags in production techniques and suffers from lack of infrastructure, job training and from corruption that undermines efficiency. But, added Athreya, "There is no question that the secondhand clothing market has had a significant impact on domestic African clothing production. The tailors, the small producers have been put out of business.

Those were good jobs for Africans and there are no jobs taking their place. This is a trade that feeds on the poor rather than benefits the poor. And if Africans can't keep their factories open in order to make clothes, they can't make clothes to export to the United States, thus they continue to suffer economically.

Neil Kearney, general secretary of the Brussels based International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers Federation says the practice is exploitative, "It is neo colonialism in its purest form. It's exporting poverty to Africa, a continent that is already exceedingly poor. I don't like it, but I would still give. There are a lot of people who are going to constantly profit, because this is probably happening with really nice people.

With us -- and we profit too -- we get a tax deduction. If I knew how to send to Africa myself, I would. Marc Kaplowictz, whom we also met while he was donating clothes in New York City, has mixed feelings: Big picture, obviously I would be against that. I am obviously the little guy in this process. I don't think the answer is to have people stop donating. The other view is that the donated clothing market is actually the American way, that your old clothing is used at every step to create new wealth and to help people who are less fortunate.

First of all, charities like Goodwill Industries and The Salvation Army make clear on their Web sites that proceeds for charity and thrift shops, as well as from bulk sales to recyclers, go directly to support education, work and drug rehab programs for people who would otherwise suffer greatly. After all, isn't that the spirit in which you gave your clothes to begin with?

It goes to recycling, so it helps to protect the environment. Both the Goodwill and the Salvation Army point out on their Web sites that much of the donated clothes are sold in their charity shops to raise money for a variety of good causes.

But there is no mention of the fact that some donated items are sold overseas at a profit to private enterprises. One Goodwill source stressed that Americans should continue to donate their used clothing because U. At least they are not going in the garbage, and going totally to waste…I will continue donating. Somebody discovered something and turned it into a business.

I will continue donating. We Americans we collect so much. We accrue so much. And here on the streets of Ghana, Africans, for better or worse, end up buying a lot of what we give away. Most people we spoke with seemed to agree. Saudi crown prince 'totally denied any knowledge' of Jamal Khashoggi's fate.

Trump calls Stormy Daniels 'Horseface' as defamation suit dismissed. Suspicious letter was addressed to Sen. Newborn boy found dead at recycling center: Dress for Success, an organization with affiliates in more than cities around the world, accepts business attire clothing donations for women.

Check out your local career clothing donation organizations. Contact your local United Way or community foundation for help identifying local domestic violence needs, clothing donation organizations and programs that provide job readiness and search services. Contact your local police department and speak to a domestic violence contact about needs in your community and organizations that can use your donated clothing. Gail Sessoms, a grant writer and nonprofit consultant, writes about nonprofit, small business and personal finance issues.

She volunteers as a court-appointed child advocate, has a background in social services and writes about issues important to families. Sessoms holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies. Clothing Sizes and Condition Organizations that accept donated clothing for women looking for work request new or gently-used clothing in all sizes. Business Attire Donate clothing appropriate for a conservative office environment, including business suits and shoes, and clothing suitable for a business casual dress code in less formal work environments.

Video of the Day. Brought to you by Sapling. Clothing Donation Organizations Domestic violence organizations that do not accept clothing donations can refer you to a charity that accepts and provides donated clothing free of charge to people looking for work, including domestic violence survivors. Community Resources Contact your local United Way or community foundation for help identifying local domestic violence needs, clothing donation organizations and programs that provide job readiness and search services.

Domestic Violence Career Wardrobe: Find Your Local DomesticShelters. Find a League Dress for Success: About the Author Gail Sessoms, a grant writer and nonprofit consultant, writes about nonprofit, small business and personal finance issues.

Recycle and Donate Your Clothes

Just like the recycling symbol, which reminds us to properly recycle bottles, cans and more, the donate icon reminds us to consciously and responsibly donate our clothing. Christmas is one of those times of the year when many Americans clean out our closets and donate some of our used clothing to a charity. Perhaps we hope that Santa Clause will replace them with. You might have seen trucks driving through neighborhoods or bins set up in shopping center parking lots to collect old clothes. This indicates there’s importance associated to donating clothes versus simply throwing them away.

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